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Online Learning: 3 Easy Tips to Tackle Lack of Motivation

In the COVID-19 era, online learning is no longer just an option. The need for institutions, teachers and students to adapt to a new online based education system is already here, and the current circumstances don’t allow the luxury of time.

 

For some, online learning is a perfect tool: students with jobs, with kids, or with complicated schedules can arrange their agendas to their preference and tie the productive moments of their days to the learning process.

 

However, the independency that comes with online learning can be tricky: being at home, surrounded by potential distractions, with the fridge and Netflix at hand you may have a hard time finding motivation to actually sit down and stare at the screen through seemingly endless lectures that are (let’s face it) not always the most entertaining.

Online learning

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Yet, subjects need to be learned and classes must be attended, so how can you gather enough motivation to face the new challenges of the online learning times? If you’re struggling with this problem, here are 3 easy tips to help with the process.

 

1. Scheduling the fun

One of the most common mistakes about motivation is the cyclic behavior: on Thursday, panicking because nothing got done during the week, you find yourself creating a “To-Do” list, on which all the subjects, tasks, and delayed papers are included, and all the materials and the length of the video lectures that you haven’t watched pile up mercilessly. You do your list and then you follow it…for a little while. And then you need a lunch break, you get your phone, maybe take a nap, and six hours later, after getting tired of scrolling, you realize that you gave up. It turns out that it was too much at once. You’re not a robot.

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Author:

Natalia Marcela Pitta Osses

Article Writer & Content Contributor

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The opinions expressed in this article/publication are those of the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of GiLE or its members.

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