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How to Become a Successful Learner? “Be a Child” Principle

Education as a system has two naturally dependent sides: supply and demand, represented by teachers and students (or learners), respectively. It is when the stakeholders from these sides work in a solid integration that the ultimate goal of education be met.

 

In this article, we will explore how to become a successful student by taking lessons from the behavior of children, which are in general framed as the “be a child” principle.

 

Why we should be like children?

 

Children are in a permanent state of absorbing and internalizing information. Therefore, they master the skills needed in the learning process. Some of the valuable lessons that can be adapted from that mindset are:

Curiosity

 

The most interesting, sometimes noisy, behavior of children is their burning desire to know new things that they have never known or seen before. They unreservedly ask dozens of questions about things surrounding them. This makes them inquisitive creatures. They learn almost everything by asking and sustaining their curiosity. Students, if they have a spirit of inquiry, at any time, whether they are studying on their own or in the classroom, can follow the same principle, thus being successful in their academic performance.

 

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Author:

Melese Mulu

Article Writer & Content Contributor

Melese Mulu Bayile - GiLE

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Read More

Author:

Melese Mulu

Article Writer & Content Contributor

Share this article:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print
Share on twitter
Twitter

Disclaimer:

The opinions expressed in this article/publication are those of the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of GiLE or its members.

Read more articles: